OUR CANOES

ʻŌlinolino is  a 28 ' Fiberglass Canoe molded off of the 200 year old Koa Canoe Ka'elemakule. Launched in 2016, ʻŌlinolino completed her first destination sail from Anaeho'omalu to Kīholo in June 2016.  ʻŌlinolino is on loan to the Nā Pe'a program from the  Ala Kahakai Trail  Association.

Hāuliuli is  a 28 ' Fiberglass Canoe molded off of the 200 year old Koa Canoe Kaʻelemakule.  Launched in 2015, Hāuliuli completed her first destination sail from ʻAnaehoʻomalu to Kīholo in October 2015.   

Hāluʻa and Owē here seen linked together as a double-hulled canoe are sister hulls of Hāuliuli.  

Kinikini  is a 40' double hulled fiberglass canoe.  She serves as our mother ship on destination sails.  Kinikini is unique in that she can be paddled, sailed or moved along with her 20 HP outboard motor.  When not escorting Nā Pe'a, Kinikini works for Eka Canoe Adventures conducting sunset sails, manta ray dives and snorkeling trips out of Keauhou Bay.

Mailelauliʻi is a 26' BENSON designed fiberglass canoe.  Having  a more "V" shaped hulle she is the  fastest canoe in the Nā Pe'a fleet.  Maile is on loan to the Na Pea program from Kalani Nakoa.

Mālolo is a 22' fiberglass "Makaha Surfing Canoe".  Designed for surfing competition along the North Shore of Oahu. Mālolo is on loan to the Nā Pe'a Program from Kalani Nakoa.

Holomoana is a 22' fiber glass canoe molded off a koa canoe of the 1800's.  Built in 1973, Moana is the oldest "glass"canoe in the Nā Pe'a fleet.  She is on loan to the Nā Pe'a program  from Dale Fergerstrom.

Alapiʻi is a late 1800's koa fishing canoe that was salvaged and restored in the mid 1990's.  Under the care of the Nakoa Foundation, Alapiʻi  plays a major role in explaining traditional Hawaiian Canoe Culture at public events and cultural festivals . (Yes that is real lauhala sail!)

Kaʻelemakule is an 1800's vintage fishing  canoe that was salvaged and restored in the 1990's.  Under the care of the Nakoa Foundation, Kaʻelemakule travels to cultural festivals and school presentations that explain the traditional Hawaiian Canoe Culture.  In 2015 the Nakoa Foundation and the Ala Kahakai Trail Association commissioned the construction of four fiber glass canoes in the form of Kaʻelemakule. Molded and constructed by Odie of Pure Paddles, these new fiberglass canoes are now the main stay of the Nā Peʻa canoe fleet.